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Program

Conference program

Themes and topics

You will find below the seven general themes of the conference, each including a description and a list of topics. This gives you a vision of what the conference is about. Many of the topics shown should each give rise to a presentation, a session, and/or a panel in the final program.

The first three themes are common to most applications. The next three themes correspond to three domains we have identified, each regrouping application areas that are logically connected: (1) cinema and broadcast, (2) industry, engineering, design, science, medicine, defense, and R&D, (3)  communication, education, and entertainment. The last theme looks at future, advanced technologies.

This theme is a “must” for all persons involved in 3D, whether it is in 3D stereoscopy (3DS) or in more advanced techniques closer to true 3D. It is common to all applications of 3D. You need to know about the process of stereopsis, which allows the brain to perceive distances and, thus, 3D. To deal with stereo or multiview images, you need to know the effects, on 3D perception, of different configuration parameters, pertaining mainly to the pair of stereo cameras (interaxial, convergence, ...), screen size, distance between screen and viewer, and distance between the eyes: this is the subject of stereoscopy. Whereas stereoscopy examines the effects of changes in the parameters, stereography gives you a set of rules to achieve a desired 3D-perception effect while keeping the viewer comfortable. In short, stereoscopy is about anaysis, while stereography is about synthesis. Whereas stereoscopy deals with two, or more, discrete views, holography records the light field emanating from the illuminated scene in the form of interference patterns, which ultimately allow the scene to be viewed from a continuum of viewpoints. We like to include holography among the fundamentals of 3D because there is often confusion between stereoscopy and holography! Finally, you will certainly be surprised to learn that it is possible to predict analytically all the types of 3D cameras that man can ever hope to build!

The main topics for this theme are:

  • Stereopsis 
  • Stereoscopy
  • Stereography
  • Holography
  • After all, what is a camera... for the mathematician?

This technical theme is mostly about the key hardware aspects of 3D stereo (3DS) that are common to many applications. It should thus be of interest to most people, whether they are in (1) cinema and broadcast, (2) industry, engineering, design, science, medicine, defense, and R&D, and/or (3) communication, education, and entertainment.

The theme covers the main conventional means for (1) acquiring (real) 3D stereo and multiview images, as well as range images (also called z-maps), and (2) for visualizing various kinds of 3D contents, on displays or screens, with or without glasses.

The main topics for this theme are:

  • Acquisition of real 3D stereo and multiview images: 3D cameras and rigs
  • 3D visualization equipments: (1) 3D displays (monitors and TVs) with glasses
  • 3D visualization equipments: (2) 3D projection systems with glasses
  • 3D visualization equipments: (3) Auto-stereoscopic/multiscopic displays (i.e. without glasses)
  • Acquisition of range images (or z-maps): Range (or 3D) cameras and laser radars

This technical theme is mostly about the key software and algorithms aspects of 3D stereo (3DS) that are common to many applications. It should thus be of interest to most people, whether they are in (1) cinema and broadcast, (2) industry, engineering, design, science, medicine, defense, and R&D, and/or (3) communication, education, and entertainment.

The theme covers computer-graphics techniques for producing synthetic 3D images, and many crucial and sophisticated image-processing and computer-vision techniques, such as (1) for indirectly recovering range images (also called z-maps) from video images, (2) for exploiting range images in a variety of ways (e.g. for creating new video images corresponding to an artificial viewpoint, and for controlling a 3D rig), (3) for converting 2D images to 3D (i.e. for “dimensionalizing” them), (4) for compressing 3D images, and (5) for recovering 3D human motion.

The main topics for this theme are:

  • Generation of synthetic 3D stereo or multiview images: computer graphics imaging (CGI)
  • Algorithm for depth-from-stereo, depth-from-motion,...
  • Using range images (or z-maps) to change the viewpoint of one or more video images (aka "depth-image based rendering - DIBR")
  • The mother of all 3D rigs: Fusion of video and range images
  • Algorithms and tools for preparing multiple views for auto-multiscopic displays
  • 2D-to-3D conversion ("dimentionalization") and beyond
  • Real-time stereography control for 3D live capture and broadcast
  • Compression/coding of 3D stereo and multiview images
  • 3D motion capture
  • Modern anaglyphic visualization techniques

If you are in cinema or broadcast, this is primarily for you! This is one of three domains we have defined, each regrouping application areas that are logically connected. Even if you work in other fields, we suggest you take a peek at this perhaps less-familiar domain to broaden your view, and possibly identify new opportunities.

The theme covers the artistic aspects of 3D movie making (which should be viewed as distinct from, and complementary to, the technical topic of stereography), as well as various other technical, business, and psychophysical aspects related to the production, transmission, and visualization of 3D content for home and movie theaters. This specialized theme builds on some of the topics discussed in the first three themes.

The main topics for this theme are:

  • The art of 3D movie making
  • Ancillary 3D equipments on the movie set
  • Post-production tools for 3D movies
  • Status of rollout og 3D digital cinema
  • Virtual 3D studios
  • Transmission/delivery of 3D video and audio to homes and cinemas
  • 3D for theme/entertainment parks and rides
  • Audio-visual correlation, and joint use of 3D video and 3D audio/sound

If you are in industry, engineering, design, science, medicine, defense, or R&D, this is primarily for you! This is one of three domains we have defined, each regrouping application areas that are logically connected. Even if you work in other fields, we suggest you take a peek at this perhaps less-familiar domain to broaden your view, and possibly identify new opportunities.

For most members of the general public, 3D is synonymous with 3D movies, and perhaps with the famous red & green glasses. Furthermore, few realize that 3D movies are just the tip of the iceberg of 3D. However, engineers and scientists have used 3D acquisition, processing, transmission, and visualization for a long time. Not surprisingly, 3D sensing has been the object of intensive R&D in the domain of defense for several decades. The laser radars developped in this domain in the mid 80's have led to more basic range cameras that are becoming commercially available. These 3D imaging sensors are becoming a hot topic in 3D movie making, industry, and entertainment. The notion of range image (or z-map) has taken about 30 years to reach these non-defense applications! Anyone designing an object in a computer, or dealing with terrain models and remote-sensing images, is delighted to be able to see these in 3D stereo (3DS). Remote-controlled and autonomous vehicles, whether on the Earth, the Moon, or Mars, avoid rolling into ditches by using 3D sensors to build awareness of the environment. Today, 3DS visualization is way underused for examining medical images – which are intrinsically 3D (as well as volumetric) – and for remote surgery, say using an endoscope. This specialized theme builds on some of the topics discussed in the first three themes.

The main topics for this theme are:

  • 3D visualization for computer-aided design (CAD)
  • 3D visualization for numerical simulations
  • 3D imaging in machine vision and other "industrial" applications
  • 3D visualization in remote sensing, cartography, and geographical information systems (GIS)
  • 3D visualization for vehicle simulators
  • 3D imaging for robot and unmanned-vehicle control and navigation
  • 3D imaging in defense and security
  • 3D imaging in medicine and surgery
  • 3D imaging in microscopy
  • Outstanding, one-of-a-kind 3D visualization and immersion facilities

If you are in communication, education, or entertainment, this is primarily for you! This is one of three domains we have defined, each regrouping application areas that are logically connected. Even if you work in other fields, we suggest you take a peek at this perhaps less-familiar domain to broaden your view, and possibly identify new opportunities.

The term “communication” refers both to telecommunication and to the presentation of information. In this last sense, communication also includes the use of lenticular, auto-stereoscopic packaging, say for cereal boxes! 3D can be used to great benefit for teaching and training, from engineering to medicine. Entertainment includes 3D video games. This specialized theme builds on some of the topics discussed in the first three themes.

The main topics for this theme are:

  • 3D videoconferencing
  • 3D phones and portable devices
  • 3D visualization in advertising, signage, and communication
  • 3D visualization in museography
  • 3D and the internet
  • 3D visualization in education
  • 3D imaging in entertainment

In some countries, 20/20 means perfect vision with each eye, and, presumably, perfect stereopsis! 2020 is also a date that is not so distant! So, what is the nec plus ultra of 3D imaging going to be nine years from now? Is digital video holography going to supplant everything else, as some people think, leading to some new, incredible business opportunities?

This theme covers exotic, near-true-3D imaging systems ... including the ones under development in the great secret of some 3D “skunk works.”

The main topics for this theme are:

  • Free-viewpoint television (FTV)
  • Omni-directional imaging
  • Integral imaging
  • Digital video holography
  • Other futuristic 3D imaging systems